CUNY IT Conference 2023 Banner

Overview

To view speaker presentations where available, see Agenda page.

This year’s conference theme was: Us and It. CUNY in the Age of Generative AI. You have probably heard of ChatGPT, but there are so many more Generative AI applications. Whether you use a word processing tool, a spreadsheet or a slide presentation application; whether you teach, do research, serve on a Committee on Academic Integrity, Assessment or Budget and Resources; whether you work in Marketing and Communications, in Enrollment Management, Advisement, Tutoring or Counseling; whether you are responsible for cybersecurity, monitoring networks or other technical infrastructure; or whether you work on web design or software development…Generative Artificial Intelligence is ever more everywhere. From now on it is Us and It.

A message from our Keynote Speaker

Join us at the CUNY IT Conference for an unparalleled opportunity to learn, explore, and share insights about Generative Artificial Intelligence, and its impact on all aspects of our work and lives, including education and learning. From word processing to cybersecurity, Generative AI is becoming increasingly pervasive and transformative, challenging us to rethink our relationship with technology. This conference offers a platform for sharing use cases, experiences, and reflections on the philosophical and ethical implications of this new era. Be part of the conversation that shapes the policies and evaluation criteria that will guide us into the future. Don't miss this unique opportunity to gain fresh perspectives, connect with colleagues, and deepen your understanding of this essential topic, including its impact on education and learning.

- Eusebio “Seb” Formoso, Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and University Chief Information Officer, City University of New York (CUNY)

Speakers

Dave Birss

Dave Birss

The Sensible AI Guy

Dave Birss – “The Sensible AI Guy” – is one of the most popular LinkedIn Learning instructors who demystifies AI for businesses and individuals with practical advice and a touch of humor. He has lectured at universities around the world from London to New York, Singapore to Santiago. Dave’s been working with global companies on using generative AI to gain a competitive edge, which has led to him developing The Sensible AI Manifesto to help organizations get the most value out of AI while avoiding the biggest risks and making sure the technology is adopted in the most inclusive way.

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Eusebio (Seb) Formoso

Eusebio (Seb) Formoso

Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and University Chief Information Officer, The City University of New York

Eusebio (Seb) Formoso is the City University of New York Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and CIO.
As CIO, Seb drives the effort to advance the University’s IT priorities and strategy to modernize CUNY’s enterprise systems supporting academic and business operations. He partners with the college CIOs to implement solutions improving the student, faculty and staff experience and provides leadership to help streamline CUNY-wide finance, human resources and enrollment management processes. Seb is also responsible for CUNY’s cybersecurity program to protect institutional and stakeholder data and to ensure continuity of operations.
Seb serves as a member of the Chancellor's Cabinet. He also chairs the IT Steering Committee, comprising the college CIOs and functional stakeholders, that develops the CUNY-wide technology strategy.
Seb comes to CUNY with more than 20 years of experience leading information technology organizations in multiple industries. His background encompasses strategic leadership, execution of complex programs and managing transformative change across enterprises.
As CIO of the New York City Department of Finance since 2015, Seb oversaw the modernization of systems that annually administer approximately $45 billion in city business and property tax revenues. In implementing large-scale and secure cloud-based solutions, he has focused on improving citizen access to the department’s systems and information. Prior to joining the city, Seb was with IBM Global Services, where he managed complex IT services contracts for firms such as Konica Business Systems, PepsiCo, Phillip Morris, Diageo, Terminix/TruGreen and PHH.

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Michael Jabbour

Michael Jabbour

Chief Innovation Officer, Microsoft Education

Michael J. Jabbour is an accomplished organizational transformation expert with over two decades of experience in the field of artificial intelligence, human-centered design, agile development and healthcare. His unique blend of business acumen, technological expertise and passion for people enables him to turn business challenges into growth opportunities for organizations.
Michael is recognized as a thought leader in the field of digital transformation, having led several highly complex operational mergers, digital transformations, and cloud transformations that have generated substantial innovation project funding and built programs that serve millions of users. As the Chief Innovation Officer for Microsoft Education and a former Chief Information and Technology Officer for various NYC agencies, Michael works cross-functionally to achieve organizational goals and helps people collaborate and work effectively with internal and external stakeholders to enable organizational growth.
Michael's passion for transforming traditional businesses into digital entities is rooted in his desire to make a positive impact on people's lives. His work has enabled businesses to serve their customers better and improve the quality of their products and services. In his previous role as Department of Education CTO during the pandemic, Michael impacted the lives of over one million children and their caregivers and teachers in New York City. His role at Microsoft builds on the learning and inspiration he gained from his work in NYC. He is excited to work on innovations that will meaningfully improve the lives of the two billion students that Microsoft impacts worldwide.

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Ediltrudys Ruiz

Ediltrudys Ruiz

Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer, Lehman College and CUNY IT Conference Co-Chair, The City University of New York

Before becoming the vice president and chief information officer in September 2022, Ediltrudys (Edi) Ruiz was, since September 2015, the assistant vice president for Information Technology. Prior to joining Lehman, Edi served as the Medgar Evers College assistant vice president and chief information officer. Her career in higher education started in accounting and finance, serving at LaGuardia Community College in various capacities, including director of budget and financial accounting systems, fund accountant, and assistant purchasing coordinator. Subsequently, in 2000 Edi joined Bronx Community College, holding several positions with increased responsibilities in Information Technology.  Edi holds an M.S. Ed in Higher Education Administration, M.S. in Business Computer Information Systems, and a B.B.A. in Accounting degrees from Bernard Baruch College, and an A.S. degree from LaGuardia Community College. Throughout her twenty plus years career in higher education, Edi has been the recipient of numerous recognitions, including the CUNY 2011 Ribaudo Award for Information Technology Excellence, the Jane N. Ryland Fellowship from EDUCAUSE, the Bronx Community College 2012 “Extra-Mile” Award, multiple CUNY IT awards and others.

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Greet Van Belle

Greet Van Belle

Director for Teaching, Learning and Educational Technologies, York College and CUNY IT Conference Co-Chair, The City University of New York

Greet Van Belle is the director of the Center for Teaching, Learning and Educational Technologies at York College. She studied Linguistics and Philosophy at KULeuven in Belgium. She came to New York City with a multi-year President’s Fellowship from Columbia University where she pursued a PhD in French Literature. Greet taught French language, literature and culture at Columbia University, City College and Queens College and served as the interim and founding director of the Institute for Language Education in Transcultural Context at the CUNY Graduate Center. In addition to educational technologies, she has been following with much interest the development of AI, having been acquainted with it as a linguist. She credits the design and user-friendliness of her 1986 Mac for having inspired an enduring passion for digital transformation projects.

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Agenda

Thursday, November 30

12:00 pm Eastern

Registration / Exhibits Open

Gym – Haaren Hall, 4th Floor

1:00 pm Eastern

Concurrent Sessions I

Who Owns AI Art? The Challenges and Opportunities of Generative Graphic Programs

(AI Ethics, Bias and Society)

Artificial intelligence has revolutionized the field of graphic design, enabling the creation of stunning and novel images with minimal human input. However, this also raises a thorny legal question: who owns the rights to these images? The U.S. Copyright Office has ruled that AI-generated art is not eligible for copyright protection because it lacks human authorship. This poses a significant challenge for both artists and industries that rely on exclusive rights to exploit their works.

This presentation will explore the implications of this legal gap for the future of AI art. It will examine how different industries and artists may adapt to the lack of protection, and whether there are alternative ways to secure their interests. It will also discuss whether the current legal framework is adequate to address the ethical and social issues raised by AI art, such as originality, creativity and attribution.

Thomas Crowell, Adjunct Professor of Law and Director from Practice Emeritus of Cardozo Law School Film Clinic, CUNY School of Law

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Partnership and Collaboration with Generative AI in Combinative Reality

(AI Ethics, Bias and Society)

This presentation proposes a paradigm shift in our approach to working with AI, advocating for the recognition of AI as an equal partner rather than a mere tool. Grounded in the Balanced Blended Space (BBS) framework, we explore the concept of symmetry as a means to bridge the gap between human cognition and AI. The BBS framework identifies key symmetries across cognitive and computational agents, physical and virtual spaces, mediation pathways, space-time dimensions and sensory domains. Importantly, these symmetries are based on observable behaviors of cognitive and computational agents, not their internal processes, acknowledging that a complete isomorphism of internal processes is not necessary. This approach promotes balanced interactions and cooperation, fostering a seamless integration of human and AI capabilities. By redefining our relationship with AI, we can unlock new possibilities for collaboration and innovation. This presentation will delve into the theoretical underpinnings of the BBS framework, its practical implications and its potential to revolutionize our interaction with AI. Join us as we explore environments where AI is not just a tool, but an equal partner in our quest for knowledge and progress, guided by a behavioral approach to symmetry.

David Smith, Professor of Music Sound and Media Technology, Entertainment Technology, New York City College of Technology

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Use of ChatGPT to Create an Academic Support Resource for Biology Students

(AI for Academic and Student Support Services)

The generation of study materials for students, by students, is an effective tool in creating a foundational understanding of concepts found in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) courses. In utilizing GenAI, modern students will use platforms such as ChatGPT to accelerate their own learning by creating study materials that best match their learning style and specific course expectations. In this presentation, the Queens College Learning Commons, an academic support unit, explores the use of ChatGPT and its impact on student success in an introductory biology course. The presentation also highlights how the platform was utilized to create academic resources for students in this population, the administration of those resources and best practices.

Allan Edmond, Assistant Director, Learning Commons, Academic Support Center

Mitchell Baker, Professor, Biology Department

Morgan Magee, Senior Biology Peer Mentor, Learning Commons, Academic Support Center

Andy Castillo, Peer Mentor, Learning Commons, Academic Support Center

Sharnom Chowdhury, Peer Mentor, Learning Commons, Academic Support Center

Donna Smith, Director, Learning Commons, Academic Support Center

All of Queens College

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Tell ChatGPT What to Do! The Important Use of Prompt Management to Get the Best Responses

(AI for Teaching and Learning)

Once a newbie to ChatGPT gets pass the “oh wow” demonstration moments of how ChatGPT can generate output, the focus shifts to what information does one enter to get the information one wants. In the AI world, these commands are executed through what are known as “prompts,” which are text inputs or instructions provided by the user to initiate a conversation or request a specific response. Prompts can vary in complexity, from simple queries like “what is the difference between a Wasp and a Hornet” to more elaborate instructions like “write an essay on accounting history, covering relevant points for the last 100 years.” From an academic standpoint, they are important because they can be used as a tool to enhance the learning environment or, possibly, detect cheating. There is a plethora of work on prompts by emerging and established AÍ experts. This presentation will dive into the world of prompts to help the user “ask the right question.”

Joseph Foy, Assistant Professor, Online Business Programs, CUNY School of Professional Studies

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Linking Your Thinking with ChatGPT

(Research and AI)

In our ever-growing digital age, our habit of collecting articles and notes has inadvertently led to an overwhelming amount of digital noise, drowning out the valuable signals we once cherished. The joy of using our digital note libraries can slowly erode. As our article collection grows, our original thoughts become buried, making it challenging to retrieve our own unique insights. This phenomenon can result in a form of “digital dementia.”

However, there is a solution. Enter “thinking through linking.” This revolutionary concept allows us to effortlessly create connections between our notes, transforming our fast notes and free notes into linked notes. We can now create links as quickly as we think of them, no programming skills required. By relying on links as the primary way to relate our notes, we’re taking a significant leap beyond traditional folder-based systems. These links mirror the way our brains naturally work, encouraging the development of ideas and enabling us to see the bigger picture with ease.

“Thinking through linking” addresses both the issues of cluttered digital libraries and the loss of our original thoughts. It allows us to develop ideas rapidly through direct links and provides a comprehensive view of our knowledge repository. The value of this approach extends far beyond the short-term; it promises to infuse joy and confidence into our digital note systems for decades to come.

In essence, by embracing linked notes, we can unlock the true potential of our digital knowledge and enhance our digital note-taking experience.

Aicha Mustapha, Research Assistant of Electrical Engineering

Abrar M Abd Elbary, Ph.D. Student

Mohammed M Elsayed, Ph.D. Student

Kirn Zafar, Ph.D. Student

Jatin Jain, Ph.D. Student

Dhruvil Savaliya, Ph.D. Student

All of Electrical Engineering, The City College of New York

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Preparing P-12 Teachers to Teach About, With, Through and Against AI

(AI Transforming Professions and Fields of Study)

P-12 teachers’ work is increasingly shaped by generative AI. Reading and math curriculum come with AI assistants. Students are using these tools and sharing their curiosities about them. And yet, teachers have few opportunities to holistically consider these tools in the context of their work and students. Education faculty focusing on the humanities are well-positioned to guide future teachers to develop agentive, student-centered orientations towards AI tools – they already support teacher candidates (TCs) to promote students’ critical thinking about and around text. In this session, CUNY education faculty supporting humanistic disciplines ranging from social foundations and philosophy to language arts and information sciences share activities they developed as part of their participation in CUNY’s Computing Integrated Teacher Education (CITE) initiative. Activities encourage TCs to tinker with tools, and to assess affordances they may offer for humanities activities, such as conducting online research, crafting historical narratives and producing academic writing. They also foster critical conversations about linguistic and cultural bias – and the societal impacts of GenAI. Their projects position TCs as agentive; able to make decisions about how, when and why to use AI (if at all) in their work; and as empowered to support learners to make similar decisions.

Sara Vogel, Research Director of Computing Integrated Teacher Education, Office of Academic Affairs, Computing Integrated Teacher Education, Central Office

Rebekah Johnson, Professor, English Department, LaGuardia Community College

Laura Scheiber, Assistant Adjunct Professor, Behavioral Sciences, Kingsborough Community College

Alison Lehner-Quan, Associate Professor, Education Librarian, Library, Lehman College

Casandra Silva Sibilin, Lecturer, History, Philosophy and Anthropology, York College

Xin Bai, Professor, Teacher Education, York College

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

My Co-Worker the Bot: GenAI’s Revolution of the Employee Experience

(AI Transforming Professions and Fields of Study)

GenAI is the first technology to mimic human creativity – by using large-scale data models, it can generate content such as written communications or digital art. How do we harness the power of this technology at scale and what does it mean for the workforce? This session examines the symbiotic relationship between human skills and AI in the workplace. It will demonstrate how human skills can enable more effective and responsible use of AI to maximize value and impact on personal and organizational goals.

Alan Holden, Principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP

Blythe Kladney, Manager, Deloitte Consulting LLP

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Using AI-Driven Asset Intelligence to Make Informed IT Decisions and Reduce Attack Surface

(AI for Operational Optimization)

Organizations struggle to manage assets and attack surface in real time. AI-driven asset intelligence solutions can provide organizations with a comprehensive view of their IT infrastructure. This includes identifying all devices, software and network resources. This visibility is essential for understanding the attack surface and ensuring that no unmanaged or unmonitored assets are left vulnerable. Using AI-driven asset intelligence to make informed IT decisions and reduce the attack surface is a proactive and strategic approach to cybersecurity. It empowers organizations to protect their digital assets, respond to threats effectively and maintain a strong security posture in an ever-evolving threat landscape.

Robert Morehead, Client Executive, Armis

Mike Bimonte, Field Chief Technology Officer, SLED and Client Executive, Armis

Jaydeep Bhatia, Systems Engineer, Palo Alto Networks

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Strategies for More Inclusive and Effective Teaching Using AI

(AI for Teaching and Learning)

Knowingly or unknowingly, instructors have been impacted by advancements in AI over the past several years. While media focuses predominantly on the negative impact of AI on education, some AI-based enhancements in educational technologies do have the power to help instructors make teaching more accessible for learners with disabilities and more effective for all learners. This session will briefly trace the history of AI in education and offer five strategies to instructors for leveraging AI to provide a more inclusive and effective learning experience to all students. AI is here to stay, but we can make it work for us.

Jamie Ferrazano, Senior Customer Success Manager, D2L

Sam Chandrashekar, Global Accessibility Lead, D2L

2:00 pm Eastern

Break

2:15 pm Eastern

Concurrent Sessions II

Unmasking Gender Biases in AI-Generated Code: Exploring the Gendered Dimensions of ChatGPT and AI

(AI Ethics, Bias and Society)

Sexism and gender bias are pervasive issues in various domains, including coding and AI. This session aims to explore how ChatGPT and AI can be utilized to reveal and analyze instances of gender bias and sensitivity and covert/overt ways technology such as coding that seem objective are embedded and thus reveal sexist gender norms within coding itself. By examining AI-generated code for biased patterns and problematic content related to both genders, we can gain valuable insights into the presence of gender biases and work towards more inclusive and respectful coding practices.

The primary objectives of this research proposal are as follows:

  • 2.1. Investigate biases in AI-generated code: Analyze code generated by ChatGPT to identify instances of gender bias specifically related to sensitivity to body issues and gendered stereotypes.
  • 2.2. Uncover underlying gender-related patterns: Examine the structure and content of AI-generated code to detect any recurring gender-related patterns that perpetuate stereotypes, including those related to body image and domestic violence.
  • 2.3. Understand the implications of biased code: Explore the potential consequences of biased coding practices, including their impact on technological advancements, user experiences and perpetuation of harmful societal norms.
  • 2.4. Propose strategies for mitigating gender biases in coding: Based on the findings, develop recommendations and strategies to address and mitigate gender biases within coding practices and AI systems, while promoting inclusivity and sensitivity.
  • Josephine Barnett, Faculty, Sociology and Data Analytics, Queens College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    The Impact of AI on Healthcare Provider-Patient Relationships: A Systematic Review of Ethical Concerns and Strategies

    (AI Ethics, Bias and Society)

    Nchebe-jah Iloanusi, Doctor of Medicine, College of Staten Island

    AI systems hold promise for improving healthcare efficiency and accuracy. However, their impact on the fundamental provider-patient relationship requires careful evaluation. This systematic review aims to elucidate the ethical implications of applying AI in healthcare delivery and explore strategies for responsibly leveraging these technologies while preserving humanistic patient care.

    The review will examine peer-reviewed empirical literature on the effects of AI adoption on provider-patient dynamics, with a focus on essential human elements, including trust, communication, privacy, shared decision-making and overall care quality perceptions. Included studies must involve AI implementations in real-world clinical settings and directly assess their impact on provider-patient relationships and resultant ethical considerations. Proposed strategies addressing ethical tensions at the nexus of advanced analytics and compassionate care will also be analyzed.

    Exclusion criteria encompass studies centered on technical AI performance alone, applications in non-healthcare contexts, non-English publications and commentaries that are not data-driven.

    In summary, this review seeks to illuminate the intersection of cutting-edge AI, fundamental human relationships and bioethical principles within contemporary healthcare. Insights gleaned into both inherent challenges and solutions to responsibly applying technology while preserving person-centered care can enrich the discourse on evolving quality, safety and satisfaction for all stakeholders.

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    AI-ttention to Ethics: AI in Multimodal Course Delivery

    (AI Ethics, Bias and Society)

    Introducing the Mapping Multimodal Terrains (MMT) course, a faculty development program uniquely designed for inclusive, accessible and student-centered teaching. MMT is divided into a Multimodal Teaching Bootcamp and Mastery, incorporating high-impact practices like project-based learning, gamification and flipped classrooms. A standout feature is its focus on ethical AI. Faculty are trained to navigate the ethical landscape of AI in education, covering responsible AI use, data privacy and strategies to mitigate AI’s potential to perpetuate educational inequalities. A gamified badge system incentivizes faculty to delve into these critical ethical considerations. This presentation will elucidate MMT’s objectives, innovative structure and pioneering focus on ethical AI, preparing faculty for the ethical challenges that AI integration poses in educational settings.

    Ana Marjanovic, LMS Administrator and Instructional Designer, Office of Educational Technology, Hostos Community College

    Carlos Guevara, Director of EdTech, Co-Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Hostos Community College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Enhancing Academic Support: Generative AI in Tutoring and Decision-Making

    (AI for Academic and Student Support Services)

    The Learning Commons at Queens College is at the forefront of integrating generative AI into academic support and administrative decision-making. This presentation will showcase the range of utilization of tools such as ChatGPT by tutors in both professional and academic capacities. Additionally, we will demonstrate how our staff leverages Microsoft Power BI’s “Conversational BI with Q&A” to derive insights from tutoring logistics data, leading to proactive and informed choices. A spotlight feature of the session will be the innovative use of ChatGPT’s “Advanced Data Analysis and Code Interpreter” illustrating the rapid model-building for interpreting both quantitative and qualitative tutoring session data. Join us as we unfold the multifaceted applications of GenAI in an academic setting and the transformative potential it holds.

    All of Queens College:

    Ming Lei, Administrative and Special Project Assistant, Learning Commons, Academic Support Center

    Donna Smith, Director, Learning Commons, Academic Support Center

    Allan Edmond, Assistant Director, Learning Commons, Academic Support Center

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    First-Year Seminar – ChatGPT Affects Students’ Engagement and Academic Integrity

    (AI for Teaching and Learning)

    Does AI have the capability to enhance students’ intellectual development or diminish critical thinking ability? LaGuardia Community College presents the opportunity for faculty to build a strong connection with First Year Seminar (FYS) students. Faculty seek to create a deeper understanding of academic integrity by exploring the use of AI. Students in the FYS are able to assess AI tools after the systematic approach beyond the traditional learning method.

    Through this scaffolding approach, students can familiarize themselves systematically with AI tools such as ChatGPT to better understand its effectiveness and limitations while cultivating a holistic first year experience. While exploring the implications, faculty seeks to provide a deeper understanding of the ChatGPT limitation, such as text conversation, fabricated writing and immensely generic dialogue exchange. The new era of AI helps students make social and emotional connections despite the robotic sound language.

    Students completed a pre- and post-survey in the FYS courses where faculty members can compare the results to see if the students understand the academic integrity while using ChatGPT. This integrative pedagogy approached the “whole student,” cultivating students’ self-reflection while forcing us to rethink how we assess students’ learning and what we are trying to accomplish as educators.

    Sada Jaman, Lecturer

    Jennifer Arroyo, Associate Professor

    Both of Business and Technology Department, LaGuardia Community College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Graduate Education Students Evaluate ChatGPT as an Essay-Writing Tool

    (AI Transforming Professions and Fields of Study)

    In Spring 2023, the speaker invited 15 graduate education students (N=15) to participate in a qualitative evaluation of ChatGPT as a tool for completing an essay assignment. All of these students have master’s degrees in education and experience as teachers in New York City schools. Their training and experience give them keen insights into pedagogical practice making them ideally suited to evaluate ChatGPT as an instructional tool. This session will provide a recap of their evaluations, both positive and negative. They were specifically asked to respond to the following:

  • How well did you feel ChatGPT assisted you in completing the assignment?
  • Do you believe that you could have done as good, better or not as good paper without using ChatGPT?
  • Would you consider allowing students in your own classes to use ChatGPT for essay assignments?
  • What recommendation do you have, if any, for other teachers or educators in using ChatGPT?
  • Most of the participants saw ChatGPT as an aid for developing writing assignments for themselves. Several also saw it as a tool that special student populations (i.e., students whose first language is not English) could use.

    Anthony Picciano, Professor, Curriculum and Teaching Department, Hunter College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Artificial Intelligence: Librarian Experiences, Uses and Perspectives

    (Research and AI)

    This panel brings together five librarians from four CUNY libraries to discuss the theoretical and practical dimensions of generative AI's role in librarianship and instruction. The initial presenter will spotlight the diverse applications of GenAI in the research process for students, while also highlighting potential pitfalls. Next, the second panelist will consider faculty attitudes toward integrating GenAI into library instruction, shedding light on collaborative efforts between librarians and instructional faculty. Then the third panelist will give a brief overview of the various GenAI-based software tools that faculty are using to assist with their research, from topic-mapping to data. From there, the fourth panelist will consider what may be lost in the transformative experience of the traditional research process if abandoned due to increasingly sophisticated AI tools. This panelist will also offer a library perspective on the looming AI digital divide and what it means for incoming students from school systems that have restricted GenAI or lack resources for premium tools. Finally, the last panelist will present a current research project that uses generative AI for data analysis and help to accelerate library services that support the dissemination of faculty research over CUNY Academic Works.

    Eric Silberberg, Assistant Professor and Librarian, Library, Queens College

    Letitia Hazell, Instruction and Reference Librarian, Library, Baruch College

    Beth Evans, Electronic Services and Scholarly Communication Librarian, Library, Brooklyn College

    Kelly Karst, User Experience and Emerging Technology Librarian, Library, Brooklyn College

    Valerie Forrestal, Web Services Librarian, Library, College of Staten Island

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Using Us and It to Keep Pace with Healthcare Education

    (AI Transforming Professions and Fields of Study)

    Following COVID, some healthcare accrediting bodies – and even state legislation – now allow simulation as a percentage of the clinical experience for students (as of Fall 2023, this is true for Nursing Programs in New York State). Since March 2020, several York College Departments/Programs have gone as far as embedding simulations into their curriculum, beyond the high- and low-fidelity formats. Using GenAI can be a dynamic and powerful teaching method that allows for emotional processing, clinical judgment and self-reflection. We have pioneered utilizing mixed-reality simulation – and now have advanced to GenAI to better prepare our students for their future careers. We would like to demonstrate how harnessing the utilization of GenAI, combined with cinematic storytelling, is impactful in the healthcare arena.

    Renee Wright, Chair and Associate Professor, Nursing

    Maureen Becker, Dean, School of Health Science and Professional Programs and the School of Business and Information Systems

    Both of York College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Effective Data Security and Recovery Strategies for Education Institutions

    (AI for Operational Optimization)

    Data security in education is crucial as institutions increasingly depend on Microsoft 365 and Google Workspace. Users often expect automatic data protection, but it’ mostly their responsibility. Managing data across various platforms, from PCs to the cloud, can be complex and costly. With rising risks of data loss, how can schools ensure complete protection? Join this session for real-life education case studies on data storage and back-up. Discover solutions to enhance data security and conserve IT resources. Learn effective methods to safeguard dispersed data for maximum availability and comprehensive protection. Explore shared responsibility policies and strategies for Microsoft 365 and Google Workspace. Don't miss this chance to navigate data back-up and recovery complexities!

    Josue Guzman, Technical Account Manager, Synology

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Identity and Access Management Modernization for Today’s World

    (AI for Operational Optimization)

    Organizations across all industries, including higher education, have embarked on journeys to modernize their identity and access management (IAM) estate with the dual mandate of strengthening security and risk posture while simplifying adoption and reducing cost. Organizational priorities dictate different starting points and journey courses. Join this session to learn from industry experts and peers how they are leveraging multi-cloud strategies, cloud-native services and AI/ML-driven innovations to modernize their IAM solution for today’s world.

    Sandeep Banerjie, Vice President, Product Management, Identity and Access Management, Oracle

    Mark Manis, Director of Identity and Access Management, The City University of New York

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Be On the Inside When Machines Take Over the World

    (AI for Operational Optimization)

    Is the immense potential of AI worth the risk? Join us for an interactive discussion on GenAI capabilities, threats and use cases. Matt Singleton, CrowdStrike executive strategist and former CISO and CIO for education for the State of Oklahoma, will provide an overview of the platforms and lead a dynamic discussion with participants on what keeps CISOs awake at night, concerns specific to higher ed and the immediate benefits for every organization and their constituents.

    Matt Singleton, Executive Strategist, CrowdStrike

    3:15 pm Eastern

    Break

    3:30 pm Eastern

    Opening Remarks and Keynote Presentation

    Eusebio (Seb) Formoso, Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and University Chief Information Officer, The City University of New York

    Edi Ruiz, Vice President and CIO, Information Technology Division, Lehman College and CUNY IT Conference Co-Chair, The City University of New York

    Greet Van Belle, Director, Center for Teaching, Learning and Educational Technologies, York College and CUNY IT Conference Co-Chair, The City University of New York

    Keynote Presentation – Academic Intelligence: Integrating AI in Education

    Expect a broad exploration of AI’s impact on education, drawing lessons from history to help us make the right decisions for the future. We’ll evaluate the current landscape, assess the most common responses to AI and work out if and how it should be used to best prepare students for the world of work. This talk will be interactive and might even make you crack a smile. But, most importantly, it will give you practical steps you can take to get the most out of Generative AI.

    Dave Birss, Professional Speaker, Consultant and Educator, LinkedIn Learning

    4:45 pm Eastern

    2023 CUNY Excellence in Technology Awards

    5:15 pm Eastern

    Adjourn Day 1

    Friday, December 1

    8:30 am Eastern

    Registration / Continental Breakfast / Exhibits Open

    Gym – Haaren Hall, 4th Floor

    9:30 am Eastern

    Concurrent Sessions I

    The Promise and Perils of Generative AI: Figuring Out When, How and Why to Use It at CUNY

    (AI Ethics, Bias and Society)

    Generative AI will touch every aspect of work within the university, from business processes, to librarianship, to teaching and learning, to research and scholarship. Yet, these tools concentrate power. From infrastructural requirements to the problematic sourcing of training data to the fact that very few people have the technical skill to control them, only the most privileged organizations have the ability to own and, therefore, control the largest models.

    CUNY helps students develop the resources they need to succeed in an increasingly competitive world. In order to retain that status, we must think through the ethical, labor and epistemological implications of using GenAI in and across our domains. How, given the breathless rhetoric of its proponents and the economic and time pressures of work in the contemporary university, can we wisely weigh its benefits and risks?

    This panel discussion will feature Graduate Center scholars discussing how they’ve followed developments in AI over the past year and incorporated an understanding of its presence into their teaching, scholarship, leadership and planning. The panelists will then engage attendees in dialogue about how we might develop strategies for deployment and policies and guardrails for the safe and productive use of generative AI.

    Luke Waltzer, Director, Teaching and Learning Center

    Steve Everett, Provost, Office of Academic Affairs

    Maura Smale, Chief Librarian, Mina Rees Library

    Lisa Rhody, Deputy Director of Digital Initiatives, Digital Initiatives

    Michelle McSweeney, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Data Analysis and Visualization

    Zachary Muhlbauer, TLC Fellow/Adjunct Instructor, English Department

    All of CUNY Graduate Center

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Ivy Quantum for IT Help Desk: A Revolution in User Support

    (AI for Academic and Student Support Services)

    In an era of rapid technological advancement, efficient IT support is essential for educational institutions. The Lehman College IT Help Desk, responsible for addressing the diverse technology needs of students, faculty and staff, faces the challenge of providing timely and effective assistance. Luckily, our Lehman Lightning Bot just got fired up with an innovative AI-powered solution. Ivy Quantum represents a paradigm shift in IT support by harnessing the power of AI and natural language processing. This platform promises to streamline user inquiries, resolve common issues and optimize resource allocation. Through Ivy Quantum’s sophisticated chatbot capabilities, the IT Help Desk can offer 24/7 support, reducing response times and enhancing user satisfaction.

    In this presentation, we will explore the implementation of Ivy Quantum at Lehman College’s IT Help Desk, discuss the methodology behind integrating Ivy Quantum into the existing support infrastructure, the results achieved in terms of reduced workload for support agents, faster issue resolution and improved UX.

    Join us in exploring the future of IT Help Desk support, where Ivy Quantum’s capabilities meet the unique needs of Lehman College and potentially revolutionize IT support services across CUNY campuses.

    Deira Pereyra, Director of IT Enterprise Application Services Director of IT Enterprise Application Services

    Susan Lai, Director of IT Support Services

    Both of Information Technology Division, Lehman College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Integrating AI-GPTs with Real-Time Analytics to Optimize Workflows and Associated KPIs and PMPs in Support of CUNY 2023 – 2030 Strategic Plan Goal 4: Modernization of CUNY

    (AI for Operational Optimization)

    AI applications now cover countless organizational domains, including colleges processes. While working at Penn State as a computer programmer, one of the speakers developed AI-driven diagnostic and predictive models to increase retention. This session will highlight how, by applying GPT and other AI tools, colleges can increase enrollment and raise college sustainability.

    Key questions to be addressed:

  • Why AI: Modernization (CUNY’s goal 4) Processes Automation; Optimization
  • AI Applications Domains: Businesses Processes; Recruitment and Admission; Advising
  • Which AI Tools: AI GPT; Machine Learning; NLP; Rules-Driven Expert Systems
  • Analytics: AI Real-Time Analytics to Monitor Student Progress Toward Graduation; Decision Support Systems
  • AI Deployment Factors: Time; External Expertise; Finding
  • The CUNY Strategic Plan 2030, goal 4, “Modernize the CUNY System,” will be used as an overarching framework to optimize workflow of processes from recruitment to graduation. The speakers will also propose how AI can counteract the effect that demographic changes might pose a challenge to CUNY.

    Alirio Valbuena, Associate Provost and Director of Institutional Research, Office of Academic Affairs, Institutional Research

    Roman Mitchell, Faculty, Mass Communication Department

    CY Nakpodia, Website Support, Information Technology Department

    Stephen Wymore, Director, MEC Educational Technology Center

    All of Medgar Evers College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Artificial Intelligence and Art History: Exploring New Dimensions in Cultural Analysis

    (AI Transforming Professions and Fields of Study)

    In recent years, the integration of AI and the field of art history has opened up a captivating realm of possibilities for studying, interpreting and appreciating art across cultures and epochs. This session aims to bring together scholars, researchers, artists and technologists to delve into the transformative intersection of AI and art history. The session will encompass a diverse array of topics, including but not limited to:

  • Art Authentication and Attribution: Explore how AI algorithms are being employed to analyze brushstrokes, pigments and styles, aiding in the authentication and attribution of artworks, while also addressing the ethical considerations that arise.
  • Visual Analysis and Pattern Recognition: Examine how AI-driven image recognition and pattern analysis techniques are being harnessed to uncover hidden details, symbolism and artistic influences within visual artworks.
  • Generative Art and Creativity: Discuss the evolution of generative art, where AI algorithms are used to create new art forms and styles, pushing the boundaries of creativity and questioning traditional notions of authorship.
  • Curatorial and Museum Practices: Investigate how AI is shaping the curation and presentation of art exhibitions, enhancing visitor experiences and aiding in the creation of virtual galleries accessible to global audiences.
  • Cultural Heritage Preservation: Explore the role of AI in preserving and restoring cultural heritage, from digitizing ancient artifacts to reconstructing historical monuments, and the implications for preserving cultural diversity.
  • Narrative and Contextual Analysis: Analyze how AI-driven natural language processing is helping art historians contextualize artworks within historical, social and cultural frameworks, offering new insights into artistic intention.
  • Collaboration between AI and Artists: Examine collaborative efforts between artists and AI, highlighting how AI tools are being used as mediums for artistic expression, influencing artistic practices and expanding creative horizons.
  • Ethical and Societal Implications: Delve into the ethical dilemmas surrounding the use of AI in art history, including issues of bias, privacy and the potential impact on the traditional role of art historians.
  • This session helps to foster interdisciplinary dialogue, promote innovative research, and envision the future landscape where AI and art history converge. As we navigate the ever-evolving relationship between technology and cultural analysis, the conference will shed light on the multifaceted ways AI is reshaping the field of art history and redefining our understanding of art and creativity.

    Mar Morosse, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Fine and Performing Arts, Baruch College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    DeepDive.NYC: Using AI to Create a Reporting App for New York City

    (Research and AI)

    New York City is an intimidating first beat for undergraduate journalism students who can sometimes lean on secondary sources in their reporting, instead of drilling down to original ones. DeepDive.NYC is an AI-powered topical tool that helps reporters gather information, statistics and datasets from city agencies. Instead of starting their reporting by Googling and selecting dubious sources to cite, students pick a topical keyword in DeepDive.NYC which provides an in-depth overview of the subject, including the function of each city agency, key reports and links to available data. In addition to this utility, the tool refines student research skills and helps them develop effective reporting habits. It offers students insight into the intricate workings of urban governance and how municipal systems operate. Lastly, the tool – the first pass of which is produced by AI – shows students the strengths and weaknesses of the technology.

    Christine McKenna, Assistant Professor Journalism and Media Studies, Lehman College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Artificial Intelligence in Education and Counseling Settings

    (AI Transforming Professions and Fields of Study)

    This study focuses on the perceptions of teacher candidates and counseling students about the use of AI in professional contexts. Using surveys and open-ended responses, the research aimed to uncover attitudes and concerns regarding AI technology integration in PK-12 classrooms and counseling settings. Recent research has shown that AI is used in education spaces as conversational agents (Su and Bartel, 2019; Xu, 2022), to automate student evaluations (Yau, 2023) and as teaching aids (Sperling, 2022). In university settings, chatbot satisfaction has been found to correlate with student self-efficacy and course satisfaction (Durak, 2022). The research used Likert-scale and open-ended questions to gather information about counseling and educational uses of AI to promote digital literacy, support differentiation for students with disabilities, improve administration and scheduling, personalize learning and promote social-emotional growth. Teacher candidates most supported use of AI for reading and language learning and assistance with administrative tasks. Counselors' responses highlighted AI’s potential to help them track client data. Many participants were concerned that they should not depend on information based on AI – and that AI should not remove the human element from their profession. This research contributes valuable insights to the ongoing discourse on AI’s multi-faceted integration in education and counseling.

    Valerie Cosgriff, Research Associate

    Sarah Bonner, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology

    Both of School of Education, Educational Psychology, Hunter College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Can AI Impact Student Success in Brightspace?

    (AI for Teaching and Learning)

    The rapid advancement of AI has disrupted various industries, higher education being one of the more impacted. As educators and institutions continue to explore innovation in learning, AI integration in third-party tools and learning management systems (LMS), such as D2L’s Brightspace, presents an exciting frontier. This presentation seeks to discuss the potential benefits, challenges and future of AI-enhanced features in Brightspace and how these might impact teaching and learning at CUNY. The LMS transition team will showcase features in CUNY’s Brightspace, which employs AI, and outline areas of research and development on D2L’s product roadmap for Brightspace. These include using a natural language chatbot for 365-24-7 user end support for instructors and learners in Brightspace, the Annotations feature in Assignments (which was informed by machine learning and learning science) and the Insights feature which allows students to plan their time and projects more effectively. AI in Brightspace also ensures equity with accessible video. Multiple languages may be closed-captioned and transcoded to stream to any device using AI. This can save D2L users and client accommodation offices significant time and money, but, more importantly, its search functionality makes learning accessible to all in real-time.

    Evan Silberman, University Executive Director, CUNY Online and LMS Transition Lead, CUNY Central Office

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Using a Chatbot to Improve a Library Website

    (AI for Academic and Student Support Services)

    Chatbots, a form of artificial intelligence, answer user questions using natural language processing. Chatbots enhance websites by assisting users navigating them in search of information. Understanding what questions users ask a chatbot and placing them in subject categories can help reveal the types of information users are searching for on the website. This presentation will discuss a current project conducting a quantitative content analysis of these questions posed to the Lehman Library’s chatbot. The presenters will highlight their preliminary analysis, which reveals some of the chatbot’s weakness, specifically the questions users pose that it cannot reliably answer. How the information gleaned from the analysis may also improve the library website through content additions and layout changes will also be presented. The presenters will argue that projects using AI, like chatbots, can lead to better website experience for library users, who rely on both the chatbot and the library website to provide them with information on library-related services and resources.

    John DeLooper, Web Services Online Learning Librarian, Leonard Lief Library

    Michelle Ehrenpreis, Assistant Professor/Electronic Resources Librarian

    Both of Leonard Lief Library, Lehman College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Why Apple in Higher Education

    (AI for Teaching and Learning)

    Cutting-edge technology in higher education makes it easier for leaders to execute their vision of success – and Apple technology is redefining every aspect of higher education. This session will guide you through how Apple teams with higher education institutions to build seamless technology-based experiences that eliminate barriers for students, faculty and staff.

    Chris Hunte, Systems Engineer, Apple Inc.

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Navigating the AI Labyrinth: Cybersecurity, Privacy and Beyond

    (AI for Operational Optimization)

    This insightful talk delves deep into the nexus of AI, cybersecurity and privacy in our rapidly evolving digital landscape. Charting the trajectory of AI’s evolution, this presentation spotlights both security and privacy challenges using as foundational context some historical elements that have influenced our current reality. Using this historical context, attendees will be led to reason about present and future efforts to support the ethical and secure use of AI, as well as the crucial role of academic institutions in Using a Chatbot to Improve a Library Website molding AI’s future.

    Hernan Londono, Chief Technology and Innovation Strategist – Education, Dell Technologies

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Unleashing the Power of Data: Data Management and AI Integration

    This session explores AI EBL (experience-based learning) which uses past experiences for predicting current and future real-world outcomes – and identifying the best immediate proactive response according to your prioritized set of goals, all in real-time. Join us to learn more about AI EBL and its uses in higher education.

    Sundu Rathinam, Senior Partner, RighIT

    Sathish Rajamani, Vice President of Solutions, RighIT

    10:30 am Eastern

    Break

    10:45 am Eastern

    Welcome Remarks and Keynote Presentation

    Welcome Remarks

    Eusebio (Seb) Formoso, Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and University Chief Information Officer, The City University of New York

    Keynote Presentation – AI Unleashed: Transforming and Empowering Higher Education Institutions

    Discover the transformative world of artificial intelligence, from its fundamentals to its uncharted propensity to “hallucinate.” Learn how AI can revolutionize education, operations and enhance teaching, learning and research experiences with cutting-edge tools and personalized tooling. Dive into the potential of AI to automate routine tasks, stimulate collaborative learning, virtual academic support services and foster bespoke educational journeys. Get equipped with practical use cases and insights on AI ethics, bias, how AI will pave the way for a future where fields of study are intuitively tailored, engaging and impactful.

    Michael Jabbour, Chief Innovation Officer, Microsoft Education

    12:15 pm Eastern

    Lunch (until 2 p.m.)

    1:00 pm Eastern

    Concurrent Sessions II

    Ethical Use: ChatGPT and Responding to Racism

    (AI Ethics, Bias and Society)

    A colleague in the English Department suggested what the ethical use of ChatGPT might look like. Students can use the technology to generate varieties of a paragraph and evaluate the effectiveness of the language, based on what the student is trying to communicate. Given this suggested use, I want to provide a rationale for my most vulnerable students’ using the technology in this way; this is considering the problematic and relevant history of racism in English instruction. I did my dissertation on the founding turn – or what some call a Copernican shift – in composition towards writing as a process. Yet, at the same time, that seminal paradigms were being developed for an ideal native speaker, some leading researchers were positioning native-born African-American students as foreign language learners. I uncovered first-year writing courses, where Black students were subjected to hyper-correction and pronunciation drills. In a recent historiographic work, David Fleming uses race-neutral language to suggest that a professional managerial class is still prone both to panic and hypersensitivity around the perceived illiteracy (or underperformance) of an underclass, which has material implications for marginalized students in CUNY. I am advocating for open discussions about racist assessment in higher education – and how students can use ChatGPT to respond to hypercorrection.

    Dorell Thomas, Doctoral Lecturer, English Department, Office of Academic Affairs, Brooklyn College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Improving Student Online Web Design, Content and Organization with AI Integration

    (AI for Academic and Student Support Services)

    The need to effectively showcase a student’s course work, skills, accomplishments and college experience in a digital platform has become essential for post graduate goals. To enhance online presentation and elevate the design and visual appeal, AI tools can save time and give several design options for inspiration to students when creating their online portfolio website. Furthermore, AI can assist in improving layout and visual content to improve engagement. And, lastly, AI-driven content analysis programs and site analytics can identify viewership engagement and retention. The John Jay College tutoring and student support services will discuss several AI tools used to enhance online web design and student content that improved students’ online portfolios that led to an increase of online engagement and to post graduation opportunities.

    Girard Tecson, ePortfolio Program Manager

    Alyssa Cruz, ePortfolio Program Assistant

    Both of Office of Student Academic Engagement and Retention, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Generative AI: Fostering Entrepreneurial Spirit and Student Engagement

    (AI for Teaching and Learning)

    In the fast-paced world of AI, it is imperative to incorporate entrepreneurial concepts into educational paradigms. Our session dives into this intersection, illuminating how generative AI can be used to enhance students’ engagement and foster their innovative mindsets. We will showcase real-world applications and demonstrate how GenAI not only serves as a tool for creating engaging content, but also acts as a springboard for entrepreneurial thinking. Participants will gain insights into practical implementation strategies, creating a robust platform for students to harness AI’s potential. This engaging session will provide educators, IT professionals and policy makers with the tools they need to drive the future of education.

    Shane Snipes, Assistant Professor and Deputy Chairperson, Business Management Department, Borough of Manhattan Community College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Teaching and Learning with AI: Strategy and Plan of Action to Support Your Faculty and Students

    (AI for Teaching and Learning)

    Join us for an insightful session as we delve into our journey to empower and support faculty and students on the use of GenAI. As the digital landscape evolves, so does the potential for AI to revolutionize teaching and learning. At Lehman College, we are committed to equipping our faculty and students with the knowledge, skills and resources to harness GenAI for educational excellence. In this session, we will share our approach and strategy for developing a plan of action to support faculty and students – from introducing them to the essentials of GenAI to best practices for instructional design with AI to the Dos and Don’ts for Students. Additionally, we will share two instruments that we developed to assess the needs of faculty and students for training and support on the use of GenAI that you can adopt for your use. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn about our experiences at Lehman College and discover how you can embark on a similar journey within your institution. Join us in this dynamic presentation to unlock the potential of AI for teaching and learning excellence. Together, we can shape the future of education through innovation and collaboration.

    Olena Zhadko, Director of Online Education

    Dermot Foley, Associate Director

    John Mcdonough, Instructional Designer

    Asma Neblett, Online Support and Resource Specialist

    All of Office of Online Education, Lehman College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Effectively Using Generative AI In Accounting, Finance and Economic Courses

    (AI Transforming Professions and Fields of Study)

    This panel presentation will focus on specific ways in which lecturers and professors across the business curriculum, specifically in quantitative courses, can effectively make use of GenAI tools. Topics to be discussed include, but are not limited to, 1) how to introduce students to the functionality of GenAI tools, 2) the opportunities and challenges inherent in using GenAI in the classroom, 3) the different types of GenAI in the marketplace (image generation, for example) and how these can be used in research and presentations, 4) having students sign up for (free) versions of several applicable GenAI tools and 5) encouraging real-time use of GenAI, combined with requiring students to explain and discuss the delivered results. Additional topics include how students could create a report or presentation discussing the advantages, disadvantages, and suitability of each tool for specific business tasks. Additionally, discussions will be held around methods to assign students a quantitative task or business problem that requires them to use GenAI tools in real-time to derive insights or generate solutions and explain the steps taken, input involved and the results they came up with.

    Sean Stein Smith, Associate Professor, School of Business, Accounting Department

    Lawrence Fauntleroy, Director, Experiential Learning, School of Business

    Both of Lehman College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Unlocking Opportunities: Leveraging Generative AI in University-Sponsored Programs Research Administration

    (Research and AI)

    Explore the transformative potential of generative AI in university-research administration. As universities strive to enhance research capabilities and support a culture of innovation, the need for efficient and effective management of sponsored programs has become paramount. This presentation will share lessons from deploying a sponsored programs’ Large Language Model Chatbot and how it optimizes research administration operations and unlocks opportunities.

    By harnessing the power of GenAI, a university office of sponsored programs chatbot can develop training materials, policies and SOPs. It can offer immediate support and guidance by analyzing queries and providing real-time responses, empowering staff members to overcome challenges and reducing time on tasks. It can enhance productivity and job satisfaction. An OSP Chat will allow research administrators to focus on higher-value activities, such as strategic planning, relationship building and facilitating research collaboration resulting in improved operational effectiveness and increased capacity to support research excellence. This improves the quality of research administration services.

    This presentation will highlight the collaboration of AI experts, research administrators and stakeholders to tailor LLM to the research administration's needs, maximizing staff benefits and optimizing research support.

    Lisa Wilson, Assistant Vice President, Office of Research Administration Optimization, Emory University

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Open(to)AI: Fostering Informed Pedagogical Decisions at Baruch

    (AI for Teaching and Learning)

    Part of the mission of the Center for Teaching and Learning at Baruch College is to foster awareness and exploration of technological tools for education with a student-centered, faculty-led approach. With the release of OpenAI’s ChatGPT, we’ve seen curiosity, fascination and fear on campus about GenAI as a classroom tool. During this presentation, we will discuss what we’ve learned from our programming on GenAI. For Fall 2023, we developed a series of cross-disciplinary faculty conversations to learn more about how students and instructors are using (or restricting) AI and to explore together alternatives to bans, which may be impractical in the longer term. Our series aims to help faculty understand and make informed pedagogical choices about AI use by subdividing its key implications into discrete conversations, such as classroom policies, academic integrity, assignment design and faculty labor. We guide faculty towards developing hands-on understanding of it on their own terms, recognizing its affordances and constraints, and considering its impact on the lives of students. Drawing on the perspectives of critical education technology scholars like Sue Clegg and Stephen Brier, we offer a model for faculty development that emphasizes a “critical embrace” of new and uncertain technology use in the classroom.

    All of Center for Teaching and Learning, Baruch College:

    Tamara Gubernat, Assistant Director

    Seth Graves, Digital Pedagogy Manager

    Hamad Sindhi, Digital Pedagogy Manager

    Pamela Thielman, Digital Pedagogy Specialist

    Katherine Tsan, Digital Pedagogy Specialist

    Christopher Campbell, Digital Pedagogy Specialist

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Hands-On Exploration of Generative AI: Cultivating Critical Insight in the Classroom

    (AI Ethics, Bias and Society)

    In this panel discussion, we will explore the use of classroom assignments to illuminate the issues of bias and imperfections in the training data of GenAI and how to challenge students to think critically about the data sources used to train GenAI systems. By using real-world examples and case studies, students can gain a deeper understanding of how unchecked biases in data can perpetuate and amplify societal inequalities. The assignments are designed to be interdisciplinary and can be used in various classes. The panel will discuss ethics, fairness and transparency in the construction of GenAI and the ethical implications of a lack of transparency in the data sources and their provenance.

    Pamela Stemberg, Adjunct Assistant Professor, English Department, The City College of New York

    Sharon Persinger, Associate Professor, Mathematics and Computer Science Department, Bronx Community College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    eSports in Education: Next Level AV Infrastructure Designs

    (AI for Teaching and Learning)

    Educators embrace esports to promote teamwork, communication, problem-solving, creativity and SEL. Whether a dedicated facility, converted room or flexible space, institutions are investing in audiovisual systems and infrastructure to empower learners and improve outcomes. Explore complementary roles of generative AI powering data-driven insights and personalization, and audiovisual systems to elevate the overall esports experience for players and viewers. Learn audio visual technologies that meet key requirements of gameplay, coaching, spectating and streaming. Explore AV infrastructure to switch, control and distribute signals sent throughout a facility with pristine quality and minimal latency. Lastly, we’ll discuss scalable systems that can evolve over time.

    Roy A. Hermanson, Jr., Regional Applications Specialist, Extron

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Storing the Future: Harnessing Robust Infrastructure for AI-Driven Educational Excellence.

    (AI for Operational Optimization)

    As AI reshapes education, the backbone supporting it demands attention. Dive deep into the pivotal role of data storage in ensuring that AI in education is not just efficient but revolutionary.

    Rich Barlow, Principal Technologist, SLED, Pure Storage

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    AI-Generated Formative Practice: A Deep-Dive into the Learning Science and Performance Analysis Research

    (AI for Teaching and Learning)

    The Doer Effect research has found that doing formative practice while reading is about six times more effective for learning than reading alone, and is causal to learning (Koedinger et al., 2015; 2016). AI is a tool that can support scaling formative practice to more students. This session will review the research supporting formative practice and the state of AI question generation. Additionally, published research will be presented that uses large-scale student data from natural learning contexts to analyze the performance metrics of these AI questions, student learning behaviors and best practices from classroom applications.

    Rachel Van Campenhout, Senior Research Scientist, Learning Science, VitalSource Technologies

    2:00 pm Eastern

    Break

    2:15 pm Eastern

    Concurrent Sessions III

    Bias, Accuracy and Ethical Issues of AI for College Faculty and Students

    (AI Ethics, Bias and Society)

    In the ever-evolving landscape of higher education, the integration of generative AI presents both tremendous opportunities and significant challenges for college faculty and students. This transformative technology offers the potential to revolutionize teaching and learning, but it also raises critical questions about bias, accuracy and ethical considerations when using GenAI. Faculty are tasked with understanding and mitigating bias in AI-generated content, striving for accuracy in AI-driven educational materials and navigating the ethical complexities of AI in academia. At the same time, students must engage critically with AI-generated content and advocate for responsible AI practices. Together, as educators and learners, we embark on a transformative journey, harnessing the potential of GenAI while upholding the principles of fairness, accuracy and ethics to enrich the educational experience for all. During the session, the presenter will provide practical examples on how faculty and students can address these concerns in the college classroom.

    Olena Zhadko, Director of Online Education, Lehman College

    Matt Gold, Director, Graduate Center Digital Initiatives, CUNY Graduate Center

    Carlos Guevara, Director, Office of Educational Technology and Co-Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Hostos Community College

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    AI versus AI, Circa 2023

    (AI Ethics, Bias and Society)

    With the rapid growth and widespread availability of easy-to-use GenAI tools, the use of their output for academic purposes has had an accompanying rise. While for faculty there is some concern that these tools are built on abuse of copyright laws and the legal rights of authorship, the largest concern is to their almost sure potential to undermine faculty educational goals for student development and the reliability of current means of student assessment. The pressing issue is that policies and practices of academic integrity are meant to be the means of ensuring the success of this educational system of faculty instruction and assessment, but it appears that the use of GenAI is nearly undetectable, yet ripe for exploitation and misapplication in the college classroom. To what extent should faculty expectations grounded in policies and practices around academic integrity evolve to adjust to new realities?

    In Spring 2023, CUNY's University Faculty Senate proposed modifications to CUNY’s board-approved academic integrity policy to include generative AI. This panel discussion will give an overview of the proposed changes to CUNY’s policies and an overview on faculty awareness, interest and perspectives on the positive and negative impact of GenAI on their educational goals and practices.

    John Verzani, Chair, University Faculty Senate, College of Staten Island

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Empowering Students with AI-Supported Academic Advising Tools

    (AI for Academic and Student Support Services)

    Academic advising is essential for promoting success among university students, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds. Unfortunately, the availability and accessibility of adequate advising can become a hurdle to academic success. Freely accessible AI-powered large language models, such as ChatGPT, generate human-like text responses to users’ prompts and have been utilized in areas such as the healthcare industry to facilitate interactive dissemination of information and decision-making.

    Our study explored how LLMs might make academic advising more accessible, efficient and effective. We have compiled a list of questions frequently asked by current and prospective students in our teacher education bachelor’s degree program, will enter them into ChatGPT – and possibly other LLMs – and plan to explore and evaluate the answers for content and delivery. Our initial findings reveal that, surprisingly, ChatGPT generated high-quality answers written in an authoritative yet supportive tone. It was particularly adept at addressing general and open-ended career-related questions, such as career outlook and satisfaction, in a clear, comprehensive and supportive manner using plain language. We argue that AI-powered LLMs, such as ChatGPT, may complement, but not replace, human academic advisors and promote educational equity by empowering individuals from all backgrounds to initiate effective methods of seeking academic advice.

    All of Elementary and Early Childhood Education Department, Queens College:

    Michelle Fraboni, Assistant Professor

    Daisuke Akiba, Associate Professor

    Michael Perrone, Clinical Professor

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Empowering Critical Thinkers: Nurturing Questioning Skills with AI-Generative Programs

    (AI for Teaching and Learning)

    In an age where AI generative programs like ChatGPT are becoming increasingly prevalent, the art of asking insightful questions is more vital than ever. This presentation explores how educators can harness the capabilities of AI tools to foster the development of critical thinking and questioning skills among students. By striking a balance between AI assistance and human cognitive abilities, we delve into strategies for integrating questioning into the classroom while leveraging AI-generated content. Join us as we highlight the role of questioning in promoting curiosity, active engagement and a deeper understanding of complex topics. Discover how collaborative learning, reflective assignments and evaluative thinking can transform students into lifelong learners, adept at navigating both AI-powered information and the demands of a rapidly evolving world. Join the conversation on embracing AI as a catalyst for enhancing, not replacing, the indispensable skill of asking better questions.

    Fausto Canela, Academic Technology Specialist, Center for Teaching, Learning and Professional Development, College of Staten Island

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    The Potential of Generative AI in the Nanoscience Domain

    (AI Transforming Professions and Fields of Study)

    Running an academic nanofabrication facility, like the one at the CUNY Advanced Science Research Center, relies on knowledge scattered across fragmented repositories. A prime example is the MIT-Labnetwork, a forum for discussion on topics pertaining to research and teaching in nanofabrication facilities. Since 2007, it has archived email threads from field leaders at both national and international levels. However, its format makes accessing specific information challenging, and its specialized language often diverges from standard LLM training.

    This study explores the ability of GenAI to consolidate and restructure this knowledge. We process 17 years of blog threads by scraping the archives of the MIT Labnetwork web pages and employ GenAI to transform the data into a more accessible format. The aim is to make the vast nanoscience content easily searchable and expandable, amplifying its value for facility staff and nanofab academics. Looking forward, training LLMs on such curated data can lead to advanced chatbots adept at handling intricate nanoscience inquiries.

    Samantha Roberts, Director and Research Assistant Professor, ASRC Nanofabrication Facility, CUNY Graduate Center

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    AI and the Future of Finance

    (AI Transforming Professions and Fields of Study)

    GenAI and large language models make machine learning models accessible to everyone, allowing easy human-like chatting that remove the need to understand cumbersome UIs and complex concepts. In the case of financial research, whether it is for investing for oneself, a pension fund or an institution, the way finance is done – whether it is research, portfolio allocation or learning – will change. Technologies like BloombergGPT and Modelex are the first steps in changing this modality of interaction. In this talk, we explore how the future of finance and investing may look and what disruptions are occurring that will help individuals make more informed financial decisions.

    Jamiel Sheikh, Adjunct Professor, Data Science Department, CUNY School of Professional Studies

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    Unleashing Potential: GenAI and the Future of Language Learning

    (AI Transforming Professions and Fields of Study)

    The integration of GenAI has the potential to revolutionize language education. Despite AI being integrated into daily life, classrooms often use traditional practices. In foreign language education, the goal is to provide language skills that can be applied in real-life situations and align with “career-ready” concepts. Educators must reevaluate teaching methods and incorporate AI technology into language education. As such, teachers must gauge proficiency in GenAI utilization and employ collaborative approaches, such as interactive practice exercises, to facilitate skill enhancement in tandem with learners. Since June 2023, the current authors have been actively encouraging a study group for Japanese language instructors. Specifically, we have developed unit plans that align with the World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages promoted by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, exploring ways to integrate GenAI into the planning process. As of now, three training sessions have been conducted to ensure that teachers are well-versed in AI technology. The integration of GenAI not only alleviates educator burdens, but also fuels the growth of learners’ language skills. Therefore, new AI-driven strategies must be explored to promote enhanced language acquisition and proficiency, paving the way for more effective and engaging learning.

    Kazuko Saito, Adjunct Lecturer of Japanese Language and EdTech Faculty Fellow of Center for Online Learning, Hunter College

    Mieko Sperbeck, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Modern Languages and Literature, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

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    Proactive Approaches: Using AI to Enhance Writing and Mitigate Plagiarism in Education

    (AI for Teaching and Learning)

    Knowing how to properly use generative AI tools like ChatGPT is an invaluable emerging skill, and classrooms offer an ideal environment for guided exploration of how these technologies can complement and enhance learning. As AI generators become more advanced, faculty have an opportunity to take a proactive stance and thoughtfully integrate their use into pedagogy and curriculum. This presentation reviews methods and outcomes of integrating text generators into college composition courses through team writing exercises. Additional exploration of this topic will include expanding the use of AI for faculty of any discipline with writing as an integral part of their courses, and some possibilities for leveraging the technology as a part of assignments and grading. This integration is set to inspire conversations on the evolving roles of humans in potential synthetic partnerships with AI writing companions. Faculty and students can collaboratively harness the power of AI, aligning it with assignments and grading to navigate the ever-advancing technological landscape while creating pedagogically sound strategies.

    Laquan Black, Assistant Professor, Health Information Technology, Guttman Community College

    Ximena Gallardo, Professor, English Department, LaGuardia Community College

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    Rise of the Machines: AI-Powered Threats in Cyberspace

    (AI for Operational Optimization)

    In this session, delve into the evolving landscape of cybersecurity as threat actors embrace the power of AI. Explore how cybercriminals are leveraging this technology to research potential victims, generating convincing phishing emails and even crafting cutting-edge cybercrime tools like WormGPT, poised to automate attacks. Gain unique insights into the exploratory phase of AI’s integration into cyber warfare and glean predictions on how GenAI will shape the future of digital threats. This is the future.

    Preston Miller, Consulting Director, Unit 42 by Palo Alto Networks

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    Building Resilient Business Strategies: The Role of AI in SaaS Solutions

    (AI for Operational Optimization)

    Explore how SaaS, AI and data can contribute to the resilience of business strategies by enhancing collaboration between organizations and systems.

    Mason Swenson, Vice President, Product Management, CrashPlan

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    AI and Empathy

    (AI Ethics, Bias and Society)

    A key, and often overlooked, factor in developing and implementing new technologies is empathy. We’ll discuss how viewing AI through the lens of empathy has far-reaching ramifications, not only for a user’s experience with AI, but it’s impact on a far-ranging set of topics. From security to bias (not always a pejorative), technological adoption and use case development and how it all pertains to the various strata within higher education and the human inclusions therein.

    Shawn Augenstein, Principal Data and AI Consultant, CDW

    3:15 pm Eastern

    Break

    3:30 pm Eastern

    End-of-Day Drawing

    John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    524 West 59th Street
    New York, NY 10019

    Get Directions To
    John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    Advisory Board

    Education Representatives

    Tripti Batra
    Assistant Director of Web, Communications, and Marketing
    Computing & Information Services
    CUNY

    Robert Berlinger
    Chief Information Security Officer
    Computing & Information Services
    CUNY

    Seb Formoso
    Vice Chancellor for Information Technology & University Chief Information Officer
    CUNY

    Jonathan Frost
    Director
    Technology Policy, Compliance, Communications & Training
    CUNY

    Ramesh Ganeshram
    Assistant Director
    Computing & Information Services
    CUNY

    Daniel Gilday
    Chief Technology Officer
    Computing & Information Services
    CUNY

    Sadia Ismat
    Chief IT Risk Officer
    Computing & Information Services
    CUNY

    Aleks Mazo
    Deputy Chief Technology Officer
    Computing & Information Services
    CUNY

    Jarla Quamie
    Administrative Executive Coordinator
    Computing & Information Services
    CUNY

    Ediltrudys Ruiz
    VP for Information Technology and CIO, Lehman College & CUNY IT Conference Co-Chair
    The City University of New York

    Greet Van Belle
    Director for Teaching, Learning and Educational Technologies, York Col & CUNY IT Conference Co-Chair
    The City University of New York

    Industry Representatives

    Jason Bond
    Education Accounts Manager
    Extron

    Daniel Cygielman
    Senior Account Executive
    Apple Inc.

    Scott Liberman
    Account Executive, Public Sector
    CrashPlan

    Elizabeth McGrath
    Account Executive
    Pure Storage

    Joshua Meredith
    Client Relationship Executive
    Deloitte

    Robert Morehead
    Client Executive
    Armis

    Jehu Roberts
    Account Executive
    Dell Technologies

    Jim Van Orden
    Named Account Manager
    Palo Alto Networks

    Registration Information / Contact Us

    Contact Information

    2024 Sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information, contact:

    Heather Earney
    Center for Digital Government
    Phone: (916) 932-1339
    E-mail: heather.earney@erepublic.com

    Venue

    John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    524 West 59th Street
    New York, NY 10019